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Mordecai Historic Park Interpretive Center - Last meeting for public comments

posted Jan 24, 2012, 6:32 PM by Reid Serozi

A PUBLIC INPUT MEETING FOR MORDECAI HISTORIC PARK INTERPRETIVE CENTER WILL BE HELD ONTHURSDAY FEBRUARY 2, 2012 AT 7:00PM, AT ST. MARK’S CHAPEL, MORDECAI HISTORIC PARK, ONE MIMOSA STREET, RALEIGH, NC, TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED REVISED LOCATION FOR THE INTERPRETIVE CENTER.

The hard copy notice has been sent to neighbors.

 

As many of you are aware, there has been a lot of heated debate over the proposed interpretive center at the Mordecai House. The current plan is to purchase the adjacent JD & Mattie Boushall House (Danielson’s Antiques). This home would offer more space than the previously proposed new construction on the east side of the Mordecai House lot, and would still be able to retain its historic character.

 

The meeting on February 2nd will be the last chance for community comment. Plans are to purchase the property in February, so this is the most important time to comment (in support or opposition) to the project. I urge that you attend the meeting to get the details of the proposed project, and express any comments that you have. If you cannot attend, and wish to comment, I will gladly collect and relay any community input at that meeting.

                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

More information on the  House comes courtesy of the posting by Matthew Brown:

 

Dear friends,

 

I consider it wonderful news that the City wants to use the J. D. & Mattie Boushall House at 1101 Wake Forest Road for the Mordecai Historic Park interpretive center, IF and ONLY IF it intends to preserve the historic integrity of this wonderful house, which is historically and architecturally significant in its own right, for several reasons:

 

The house was built in 1922 by prominent citizens Joseph Dozier Boushall and Mattie Boushall. J. D. was chief clerk to the state auditor, member of the Raleigh board of aldermen (now called the city council), member of the N.C. House of Representatives, senior deacon of the First Baptist Church, treasurer of the Baptist State Convention, trustee of Meredith College, and commander of the American Legion. His wife Mattie was the daughter of Jonathan M. Heck, developer of much of the Oakwood and Idlewild neighborhoods.

 

The Boushall House was the first house built in the Mordecai Place development, and the finest house built in this development. The development began at Cedar St., and the Boushalls chose the most prominent lot in the development to build their grand home.

 

Most importantly, the Boushall house is a magnificent piece of architecture, Raleigh’s finest example of the last phase of the Neoclassical Revival, with its gorgeous semi-elliptical front porch supported by Corinthian columns, its balcony, and its beveled glass windows. The house and its landscape has been beautifully preserved for 90 years, in the loving hands of Arthur Danielson for the past 36 years.

 

Thank you, City Council, Parks Board, Mark Turner & Troy Burton, for your careful stewardship of Raleigh's historic treasures.

 

Matthew Brown

 

 

For those of you who can’t attend, please send comments to parks@mordecaicac.org.

 

Thanks for you input and community concerns about our park resources.

 

-David Plotner-

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